ARIZONA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Fiftieth Legislature – Second Regular Session

 

COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

 

Minutes of Meeting

Monday, March 12, 2012

House Hearing Room 3  --  2:00 p.m.

 

 

Chairman Goodale called the meeting to order at 2:18 p.m. and attendance was noted by the secretary.

 

Members Present

 

Mrs. Carter

Mr. Meyer

Mrs. Tovar

Mr. Crandell

Mrs. Pancrazi

Mrs. Yee, Vice-Chairman

Mr. Fillmore

Ms. Proud

Mrs. Goodale, Chairman

Mr. Lovas

 

 

 

Members Absent

 

None

 

 

 

Committee Action

 

SB1009 - DP (6-3-0-1)                                                            SB1259 - DPA (9-0-0-1)

SB1061 - HELD                                                                     SB1456 - DPA (9-0-0-1)

SB1066 - DP (9-0-0-1)                                                           SB1461 - DP (9-0-0-1)

SB1256 - DPA S/E (6-2-0-2)                                                 

 

CONSIDERATION OF BILLS

 

SB1061 - national school lunch program; optional - HELD

 

Chairman Goodale announced that SB1061 will be held.

 

PRESENTATIONS

 

Jac Heiss, Superintendent, Coconino Association for Vocations, Industry and Technology (CAVIAT), Flagstaff, advised that a number of students want to talk about how important joint technical education districts (JTED) have been to their educational experience.  He thanked
Mr. Crandell who helped start CAVIAT.

 

Destiny Baird, representing self, said she is in the pre-nursing program at CAVIAT, which has allowed her to participate in classes at the Coconino Community College and dual enrollment courses at the high school.  At the college, she was able to participate in hands-on experiences in a cadaver laboratory and went to the Flagstaff Medical Center where she learned to apply what she learned in the classroom to patients.  Dual enrollment classes are a great experience because students obtain college credits in the high school setting. 

 

Kyle Radford, representing self, said she is a senior at Flagstaff High School and a member of three satellite classes: culinary, fashion merchandising and auto.  She has been in the culinary program for four years and now has four scholarships to three different schools.  The classes have allowed her to advance in the career in which she is interested.

 

Danielle Kelly, representing self, stated she is a junior at Coconino High School.  She is in the computer software technology program at CAVIAT.  It has been a wonderful experience for her and fellow classmates who are thankful to have the opportunity to be in college and high school at the same time.  The students learn a wide range of skills that help them grow as individuals.  It is a great program.

 

CONSIDERATION OF BILLS (CONTINUED)

 

SB1009 - technical correction; AHCCCS; application process(now: schools; preference; childbirth; adoption) - DO PASS

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1009 do pass.

 

Virginia Carico, Majority Intern, explained that SB1009 prohibits school districts and charter schools from promoting elective abortion over childbirth and adoption (Attachment 1).

 

Ron Johnson, Executive Director, Arizona Catholic Conference, spoke in favor of SB1009.  He said the bill continues Arizona’s long-standing policy of promoting childbirth over abortion by stating that public schools cannot fund or endorse programs promoting abortion, and during instructional time, such programs must promote childbirth over abortion.  SB1009 ensures that taxpayers do not subsidize abortion propaganda in schools.  This type of legislation has become law in other states like Missouri and North Dakota.

 

Mrs. Pancrazi noted that high school health classes do not teach anything like this.  Mr. Johnson responded that if a program does not address abortion, this bill does not apply.  The
Supreme Court ruled in the Casey decision that the states have a legitimate right to promote this policy, which has also been done in Arizona through parental consent and other statutes.  

 

Mr. Meyer questioned where presentations about abortions occurred.  Mr. Johnson replied that he heard different anecdotes about school districts trying to sponsor field trips to abortion providers in years past.  Planned Parenthood has a program in place for public schools and people who talk about related issues, which is probably not done in a way that favors childbirth over abortion. 

 

Senator Nancy Barto, sponsor, advised that there have been complaints by parents over the years to the Center for Arizona Policy, that have not been addressed, that students are advised in the public school system of services that are available through abortion providers.  These providers perform abortions, so the information they provide will not necessarily be unbiased, which is the reason a policy is needed to clarify that the instruction should be unbiased, and if abortion is talked about, it must be in a context where it is not the preferred option over childbirth and adoption. 

 

In response to questions, Senator Barto stated that Planned Parenthood’s website regarding school and community programs addresses services that are offered.  The intent of this legislation is to ensure that if the organization talks about its services, it should be in the context of the public policy of the State of Arizona to prefer a life agenda and pro-life viewpoint that childbirth and adoption is preferred over abortion.  She said she does not know if other groups do this or not. 

 

Ms. Proud noted that Planned Parenthood’s website states that Arizona’s school-based sexual health education program is designed to support the development of healthy sexual attitudes and behaviors in students who are 12 to 18 years of age.  The curriculum is called the Family Life and Sexual Health Curriculum.

 

Mr. Meyer pointed out that is Planned Parenthood’s curriculum, not the school district’s.  Planned Parenthood has the right to free speech, and it is on their website, which is not addressed by this bill. 

 

Senator Barto commented that anybody with a viewpoint preferring abortion or that provides information to students about abortion services that are available should be preferring childbirth and adoption over the services offered by Planned Parenthood or the like.

 

Mr. Meyer argued that the State of Arizona is made up of millions of residents who have personal opinions.  There are statutes in place that do not allow school districts to teach children about sex.  Arizona has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the country, whereas states that teach students actual sex education have a lower teen pregnancy rate.  Saying that one option is preferred over another is a biased opinion when the statement was made that the instruction should be unbiased, but with a preferred position. 

 

In response to a question, Mr. Meyer said, to his knowledge, Planned Parenthood is not used as a training tool for sex education in Arizona schools.  If there are violations, parents have a right to complain, and there have not been any complaints to the Scottsdale School District about the sex education curriculum; students can opt out if there is an issue.

 

Chairman Goodale noted that there are only two school representatives present, so the Members are at a loss for knowing what the other 225 school districts do.  Mr. Meyer expressed the hope that the school districts would be following the law, noting that he has not heard pertinent examples so far.

 

Ms. Proud said an article in The Arizona Republic on April 11, 2010 indicates that the
Kyrene School District has one of the most comprehensive sex education curriculums in the state, which starts as young as the seventh grade.  The curriculum includes some graphic items, so each district has its own standards and the option to teach what it wants.

 

Mrs. Pancrazi submitted that school districts cannot teach whatever they want. 

 

Ms. Proud indicated that some of the items on the website are distasteful, which Mrs. Pancrazi stated is not addressed by the bill.

 

Senator Barto said her use of the word bias earlier was meant to mean if an abortion provider or one of their representatives goes to a school, they may not be biased in presenting information since they provide abortion services.  As for the state not having a bias, it does; the courts have upheld the rights of states to have a bias.  This is a reasonable and appropriate extension of the state’s compelling interest in protecting life that is supported by many existing Arizona statutes, such as informed consent.  Also, the states of North Dakota and Missouri passed similar statutes that, to her knowledge, have not been challenged. 

 

She stated that in relation to Arizona’s high teen pregnancy and birth rates, the Arizona Department of Health Services’ (ADHS) website states that since 2000, the teen pregnancy rate for 15- to 19-year-old teens declined 29 percent. The greatest reduction was among 15- to 17-year-old teens at 40 percent.  Arizona met the Healthy Arizona 2010 goal of reducing teen pregnancy in this particular cohort.  She submitted that this bill is not meant to address how sex education is taught; it is about whether or not abortion is promoted in the state in public schools.  Public polling has repeatedly shown that a majority of Arizonans oppose tax dollars funding public school programs and presentations that promote abortions.

 

When asked how the bill will be implemented and used by school boards, Senator Barto said it will give school boards guidance when representatives are invited to speak to health classes or special sex education classes and ensure that what is being taught will not be done in a way that promotes abortions.

 

Mr. Meyer remarked that he is not sure that abortion can even be talked about in schools given current statutes.  Mr. Crandell stated that when he was on the school board, the school district was given permission to offer a sex education curriculum so a policy was developed.  He perceives this more as family planning because it deals with what to do with an unwanted pregnancy.  This bill attempts to promote adoption versus abortion.

 

Mrs. Pancrazi said the State Board of Education stipulates that students must have permission from their parents or guardian to participate in a sex education class or lessons; an alternative class must be provided for students who do not enroll in the elective sex education classes.  The lessons cannot exceed one class period per day for one-eighth of the school year for kindergarten through fourth grades and one class per day for one quarter of the year for fifth through eighth grades, etc.  What can and cannot be taught is already in statute so she does not see the need for this bill.  Senator Barto replied that the clearer these types of issues are made, which are very important not only to parents but to students, taxpayers and school boards, the better. 

 

In response to a question, Senator Barto indicated that there are no specific consequences in the bill.

 

Mrs. Pancrazi asked if the Planned Parenthood curriculum is used in any public schools in Arizona.

 

Theresa Ulmer, Consultant, Planned Parenthood Arizona, opposed SB1009.  She stated that to her knowledge, Planned Parenthood does not provide curriculum to schools per se.  There was an effort years ago for the Arizona Department of Education to develop comprehensive sex education classes that could be adopted by schools that choose to do so.  There may be two high school districts that have comprehensive sex education, but she is not aware of any providing what she would consider comprehensive sex education, which educates students on the holistic approach to abstinence, methods for protection and preventing unwanted pregnancies and sexuality, that is age-appropriate.  As a parent, she does not want an educator imposing his or her moral beliefs on her children because that is a family decision, which is why she opposes the bill.  Also, she does not believe any educator wants to be placed in that position.  In relation to teen pregnancies, Arizona remains in the top five in the country and has been for many years.  Yuma and Yuma County are among the highest in the country. 

 

Mr. Meyer stated that this bill is biased.  The courts have ruled that the states can mandate certain types of sex education, but this bill mandates that children be told that the preferred choice is adoption, which is a decision a family needs to make with their daughter.  This is not something the state should be legislating.

 

Chairman Goodale pointed out that if a school district chooses to provide information on abortion, the bill requires that equal information must be provided on the preference for childbirth and adoption.  If the school does not talk about abortion, this bill is moot.

 

Mr. Meyer and Mrs. Pancrazi said they do not know of any schools involved in such discussions.

 

Mr. Crandell said the state has the responsibility to promote what it considers the state philosophy, but parents have a right and should be involved in decisions after their children are home.  He said he does not believe the bill takes away the parental right to have that discussion. 

 

Mr. Meyer submitted that he wants his children to learn unbiased facts in school and not opinions of something that is preferred based on what certain legislators may or may not believe.

 

Ms. Ulmer stated that Planned Parenthood provides services in relation to family planning in which there is talk about adoption regularly because it is a good option.  Imposing moral beliefs on everyone is not the place of government, nor is it appropriate. 

 

Mr. Johnson returned to the podium and stated this bill stipulates that the state should have a policy promoting childbirth and adoption over abortion, which is done in other respects through the parental consent and many other statutes. 

 

Cathi Herrod, President, Center for Arizona Policy, appeared in favor of SB1009.  In response to a question about complaints, she indicated that she will have to provide the information because she does not have the documentation on hand.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in opposition to SB1009 but did not speak:

Michelle Steinberg, Director of Public Affairs, Planned Parenthood Arizona

Michael Gordy, representing self

Seth Apfel, representing self

Pat VanMaanen, representing self

Jackie Thrasher, representing self

Barbara Burkholder, representing self

Frank Bing, Vice President, Arizona Education Association - Retired, representing self

Anjali Abraham, Public Policy Director, American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona

Janie Hydrick, Director for Arizona, National Education Association, representing self

Angela Schultz, representing self

Serah Blain, Secular Coalition for Arizona

Kat Sabine, mother, representing self

Carolyn Brown, representing self

Peter Bengtson, representing self

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in support of SB1009 but did not speak:

Deborah Sheasby, Legal Counsel, Center for Arizona Policy

 

Question was called on the motion that SB1009 do pass.  The motion carried by a roll call vote of 6-3-0-1 (Attachment 2). 

 

SB1066 - schools; governor’s community service citation - DO PASS

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1066 do pass.

 

Chelsea Rubin, Majority Staff Intern, explained that SB1066, retroactive to January 1, 2012, establishes a community service commendation from the Governor available to students who perform 200 hours of community service (Attachment 3). 

 

Jevin Hodge, representing self, in support of SB1066, stated that students who complete 200 or more hours of community service during their four-year high school tenure can apply for this commendation to be awarded through the Governor’s Office from the school district.  The governing board will create guidelines.  This bill will promote community service in the state and keep students in school. 

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in support of SB1066 but did not speak:

Janice Palmer, Governmental Relations Analyst, Arizona School Boards Association

Sam Polito, Tucson Area School Districts, JTED Consortium

Charles Essigs, Director of Government Relations, Arizona Association of School Business Officials

Frank Bing, Vice President, Arizona Education Association - Retired, representing self

Janie Hydrick, Director for Arizona, National Education Association, representing self

Jennifer Loredo, Arizona Education Association

Ron Lee, Arizona State Impact Aid Association

 

Question was called on the motion that SB1066 do pass.  The motion carried by a roll call vote of 9-0-0-1 (Attachment 4). 

 

SB1461 - school recordings; retention schedule - DO PASS

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1461 do pass.

 

Virginia Carico, Majority Intern, explained that SB1461 prohibits the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records (State Library) from requiring a school district or charter school to destroy audio or video recordings of its public meetings (Attachment 5). 

 

Senator David Schapira, sponsor, related that the State Library requires school districts to destroy audio and video records of meetings after five years.  There is no reason why this should be happening and he wants to make sure it does not happen any longer.

 

Mr. Crandell asked why those would be valuable after five years considering limited storage space and databases.  Senator Schapira stated that he has a card in the top of his phone that can hold five years’ worth of audio and video recordings from a school board meeting.  Technology will continue to improve and there are services such as www.box.net, etc., where information can be stored off-site at no cost.  If someone wants to go back and find out what people talked about, the information will be available.  If there is a question of intent, sometimes there is no detail in the minutes, so without the audio or video recordings, it is not possible to find out the information.  A school district can still destroy records after five years; this bill simply states that it cannot be required.  He assumed that the requirement was imposed because of limited storage for the large tapes and reels of film previously used, but that is not a problem today.  It was done in the rulemaking process, not the statutory process, so there is no record of the reason.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in support of SB1461 but did not speak:

Seth Apfel, representing self

Janice Palmer, Governmental Relations Analyst, Arizona School Boards Association

Sam Polito, Tucson Area School Districts

Charles Essigs, Director of Government Relations, Arizona Association of School Business Officials

Frank Bing, Vice President, Arizona Education Association - Retired, representing self

Janie Hydrick, Director for Arizona, National Education Association, representing self

Ron Lee, Arizona State Impact Aid Association

 

Question was called on the motion that SB1461 do pass.  The motion carried by a roll call vote of 9-0-0-1 (Attachment 6).

 

SB1256 - collective bargaining agreements; teachers; transfers - DO PASS AMENDED S/E

            S/E: preschool programs; charter schools (CONTINUED BELOW)

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1256 do pass.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that the Goodale 16-page strike-everything amendment to SB1256 dated 3/6/12 (Attachment 7) be adopted.

 

Stephanie Jaffa, Majority Assistant Research Analyst, explained that the strike-everything amendment to SB1256 (Attachment 7) allows charter schools to offer educational programs for preschool children with disabilities and applies the associated regulations to charter schools (Attachment 8). 

 

Vice-Chairman Yee withdrew the motion that the Goodale 16-page strike-everything amendment to SB1256 dated 3/6/12 (Attachment 7) be adopted.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee withdrew the motion that SB1256 do pass.

 

SB1259 - schools; online courses; requirements; funding(now: digital learning; course choice) - DO PASS AMENDED

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1259 do pass.

 

Brooke White, Majority Research Analyst, explained that SB1259 establishes a process for students in grades 7 through 12 to enroll in online courses as part of their regular course load beginning July 1, 2013 and outlines the process and funding mechanism (Attachment 9).

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that the Goodale two-page amendment to SB1259 dated 03/09/2012 (Attachment 10) be adopted. 

 

Ms. White explained that the amendment to SB1259 contains the following provisions (Attachment 10):

 

 

Senator Rich Crandall, sponsor, stated that this bill is critical to solving several problems in Arizona.  In response to questions, he provided the following information:

 

·         The amount that can be charged for a course is one-sixth of the ADM, which means that is the highest a provider can charge.  It used to be $700, but with this bill, it could be between $700 and $900, depending on whether it is high school or seventh or eighth grade.  The intent is for the number to move with school funding as opposed to a fixed number. 

·         The school district will pay the fee. 

·         Students are limited to taking three courses, however, if a student learns quickly and completes a course at the mastery level, the student can begin a fourth course, but it must be completed within the 12 months.

·         The original bill used the term course and people questioned what that means, so he called several providers who said the industry standard in the U.S. is a semester course, so for purposes of purchasing it is a semester course that can be completed in 12 months or earlier.

·         If a student passes a class in two months, credit can be obtained for that class; the student can move to the next level without having to wait for the next semester.

·         The test will be proctored since it is online.

 

Senator Crandall stated that he talked to Mr. Meyer who had some good suggestions, but he could not get them ready in time for the meeting. 

 

Mr. Meyer said he has been talking for years about how the online school system has no oversight.  According to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee, 14,000 students take the courses and almost 14,000 ADM is being generated.  He opined that this bill is a huge step forward because it includes proctoring, requires the SBE to evaluate and determine if the courses cover the appropriate content and addresses the funding issue. 

 

Discussion followed between Senator Crandall and Mr. Meyer regarding proctoring of the test by a non-family adult.  Senator Crandall indicated that he will obtain the written policy used by Mesa Distance Learning and offer an amendment. 

 

Senator Crandall pointed out that there is a one-year delay until the 2013-2014 school year because it is important to implement this program correctly.  There will be a trailer bill next session to address any problems.  Discussion continued regarding the following:

 

 

Vice-Chairman Yee assumed the Chair.

 

Senator Crandall responded to questions and indicated that he may offer amendments to clarify the following:

 

 

Chairman Goodale resumed the Chair.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in support of SB1259 but did not speak:

Tim Carter, Yavapai County School Superintendent

Deb Gullett, A Plus Arizona

Sam Polito, Tucson Area School Districts

Howard Carlson, Superintendent, Wickenburg Unified School District

Ryan Harper, Triadvocates LLC, representing self

Dianne Smith, Executive Director, Greater Phoenix Educational Management Council

Sydney Hay, A Plus Arizona - Every Child Can Learn

Sabrina Vazquez, Arizona School Administrators

Ron Lee, Arizona State Impact Aid Association

Janice Palmer, Governmental Relations Analyst, representing self

Seth Apfel, representing self

Cecilia Johnson, Assistant Superintendent/Curriculum, representing self

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in opposition to SB1259 but did not speak:

Janie Hydrick, Director for Arizona, National Education Association, representing self

Frank Bing, Vice President, Arizona Education Association - Retired, representing self

 

Question was called on the motion that the Goodale two-page amendment to SB1259 dated 03/09/2012 (Attachment 8) be adopted.   The motion carried.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1259 as amended do pass.  The motion carried by a roll call vote of 9-0-0-1 (Attachment 11). 

 

SB1256 - collective bargaining agreements; teachers; transfers - DO PASS AMENDED S/E

            S/E: preschool programs; charter schools (CONTINUED)

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that SB1256 do pass.

 

Vice-Chairman Yee moved that the Goodale 16-page strike-everything amendment to SB1256 dated 3/6/12 (Attachment 7) be adopted.

 

Stephanie Jaffa, Majority Assistant Research Analyst, explained that the strike-everything amendment to SB1256 (Attachment 7) allows charter schools to offer educational programs for preschool children with disabilities and applies the associated regulations to charter schools (Attachment 8). 

 

Mr. Crandell noted that for-profit charter schools are not eligible for federal funding and this bill draws down federal funding.  He questioned if all charter schools will be included or if there will be a distinction between those that are for-profit and those that are not-for-profit.

 

Senator Jerry Lewis, sponsor, said this bill places charter schools on parity with district public schools in order to begin the educational process as early as possible.  Data shows that the earlier a child is engaged in an academic program, the better the chances are that the child will learn to read and write, etc.

 

Mr. Crandell noted that charter schools fought diligently to avoid regulations.  Senator Lewis agreed, but stated that he is willing to take on additional regulations for the students, especially the school that brought this concept to him; they have a school for the deaf that has done miraculous things with the students.  If students can be taught earlier, he said he believes they will do even better than they are doing today. 

 

Senator Lewis related that this bill does not address the distinction between for-profit and not-for-profit schools.  A for-profit charter school would not be entitled to federal funds so this bill would be moot; in order to receive federal funding, they would have to obtain a special exemption from Congress or become a not-for-profit school.  He indicated that he is willing to work on an amendment to clarify that the bill applies to public charter schools and not-for-profit charter schools. 

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in support of SB1256 but did not speak:

Frank Bing, Vice President, Arizona Education Association - Retired, representing self

Janie Hydrick, Director for Arizona, National Education Association, representing self

 

Vice-Chairman Yee announced the names of those who signed up in opposition to SB1256 but did not speak:

Seth Apfel, representing self

 

Stacy Morley, Director, Policy Development & Government Relations, Arizona Department of Education (ADE), neutral on SB1256, said the bill adds charter schools.  In response to a question, she indicated that state law does not require certified teachers; if they are required under federal requirements, it would be for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  The charter schools will be subject to monitoring by ADE and will have to provide the correct services under the Individualized Education Plan (IEP).  

 

Eileen Sigmund, President, Arizona Charter Schools Association, in support of SB1256, said for-profit charter schools cannot receive federal funds.  If there is a federal requirement that preschool disabled students taking federal funds need to be taught by a certified teacher, it will apply in this situation, based on precedent. 

 

Question was called on the motion that the Goodale 16-page strike-everything amendment to SB1256 dated 3/6/12 (Attachment 7) be adopted.  The motion carried.

 

Ms. Proud moved that SB1256 as amended do pass.  The motion carried by a roll call vote of 6-2-0-2 (Attachment 12).

 

SB1456 - school finance revisions - DO PASS AMENDED

 

Ms. Proud moved that SB1456 do pass.

 

Stephanie Jaffa, Majority Assistant Research Analyst, explained that SB1456, retroactive to
June 30, 2012, revises sections of statute related to school finance, including auditing, calculating average daily membership (ADM) and definitions of full-time and fractional students (Attachment 13).

 

Ms. Proud moved that the Goodale 12-line amendment to SB1456 dated 03/09/2012 (Attachment 14) be adopted.

 

Ms. Jaffa explained that the Goodale 12-line amendment to SB1456 allows the generation of 1.75 ADM by students who attend joint technical education district (JTED) programs at leased facilities if they are not enrolled in the district in which the leased facility is located for
FY 2012-2013 (Attachment 14).

 

Question was called on the motion that the Goodale 12-line amendment to SB1456 dated 03/09/2012 (Attachment 14) be adopted.  The motion carried.

 

Ms. Proud moved that the Goodale three-page amendment to SB1456 dated 3/9/12 (Attachment 15) be adopted.

 

Ms. Jaffa explained that the Goodale three-page amendment to SB1456 adjusts the transportation support level to provide additional support to school districts that are in session for 200 days rather than 180 days (Attachment 15).

 

Stacey Morley, Director, Policy Development & Government Relations, Arizona Department of Education (ADE), in favor of SB1456, said ADE brought forth this bill to undo what was done by having a four-day ADM, which was believed would help with the information technology system.  She discussed the audit provision and endorsed the amendments, noting that some technical changes may be necessary to the Goodale 12-line amendment. 

 

Mr. Crandell asked if something will be done on the JTED issue for the years 2012 and 2013 after the session law expires.  Ms. Morley replied that she believes the JTEDs will be attempting to obtain a permanent statutory change.  

 

Question was called on the motion that the Goodale three-page amendment to SB1456 dated 3/9/12 (Attachment 15) be adopted.  The motion carried.

 

Ms. Proud moved that SB1456 as amended do pass.  The motion carried by a roll call vote of 9-0-0-1 (Attachment 16).

 

Without objection, the meeting adjourned at 4:50 p.m.

 

 

 

                                                                        _______________________________

                                                                        Linda Taylor, Committee Secretary

                                                                        April 17, 2012

                                                                                                                                   

(Original minutes, attachments and audio on file in the Chief Clerk’s Office; video archives available at http://www.azleg.gov)

 

 

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                        COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

12

                        March 12, 2012

 

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